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 wood burner safety info

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gadily
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PostSubject: wood burner safety info   Sun Jan 19, 2014 3:51 am

This forum has been created for like minded diy enthusiasts in creating there burners

the forum admins, mods, and members in no circumstances will be responsible for any damage to property, loss of property, injury whilst building these burners, injury to any person or thing as a result of advice or information contained or given upon this forum.

You may use the information and the advice at your own risk whilst building your own designs so please be aware of the safety implications of doing so before comencing your build.

with this said we are all here to enjoy ourselves talk between like minded people and help and pass along info to aid others

so please do enjoy your building of these devices not forgetting the safety aspects of our building

this post is a basic Safety awareness I feel is a very important part of this type of forum, with a large number of first time DIY people trying to make their own RS.


Last edited by gadily on Sun Jan 19, 2014 10:40 pm; edited 2 times in total
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PostSubject: Re: wood burner safety info   Sun Jan 19, 2014 3:52 am

carbon monoxide kills

as we are all building equipment for the home use or within other areas

For the safety of you and your family, it is advisable to fit a carbon monoxide (CO) alarm in your home. Just like a smoke alarm which alerts you to the presence of smoke, a carbon monoxide detector will alert you to the presence of CO.

The difference with CO is that it is invisible and has no smell or taste, so you might not realise it is there.

Smoke alarms do not detect carbon monoxide.


What alarm should I fit? this is uk regs other areas are different

Gas Safe Register recommends the use of audible carbon monoxide alarms. It should be marked to EN 50291 and also have the British Standards' Kitemark or another European approval organisation's mark on it. CO alarms usually have a battery life of up to 5 years.

Fit an alarm in each room with a gas appliance. Always follow the alarm manufacturer’s instructions on siting, testing and replacing the alarm.

Do not use the ‘black spot’ detectors that change colour when carbon monoxide is present, they don’t make a sound. It is important to choose an alarm that will wake you up if you’re asleep, or you may not be aware of early CO symptoms until it is too late.
Where can I get an alarm?

Carbon monoxide alarms cost around £15 and can be purchased from your local DIY store, supermarket or from your energy supplier.
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gadily
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PostSubject: Re: wood burner safety info   Sun Jan 19, 2014 3:57 am

water

water in its present cold form is fine to use and work with there is still dangers with it and most are aware of this

however with water being heated this danger changes to drastic dangers

for those that dont know using a closed loop water system is not in your best interests more so with rocket burners that can have the effect of over boiling the water within its system

this was featured via mythbusters







however closed loop system now incorporate a safety feature by blow off valves and also a direct cold supply cooling off the wood heater before the system does blow up
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gadily
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PostSubject: Re: wood burner safety info   Sun Jan 19, 2014 4:06 am

flash burn with eyes ARC and mig welding

Eyes - flash burns

Summary

Flash burns are like sunburn in the eye. They are also called welder's flash or arc eye. A flash burn occurs when you are exposed to bright ultraviolet (UV) light. Sources of UV light include a welding torch, direct sunlight, reflection of the sun off water or snow, a sunlamp and other lamps including halogen lamps. Treatment may include dilating drops, dressing and antibiotics. Flash burns may cause infection, which can lead to vision loss.

A flash burn is a painful inflammation of the cornea, which is the clear tissue that covers the front of the eye. A flash burn occurs when you are exposed to bright ultraviolet (UV) light. It can be caused by all types of UV light, but welding torches are the most common source. That’s why it is sometimes called ‘welder’s flash’ or ‘arc eye’.

Flash burns are like sunburn in the eye and can affect both your eyes. Your cornea can repair itself in one to two days and usually heals without leaving a scar. However, if the flash burn is not treated, an infection may start. This can be serious and may lead to some loss of vision.

Symptoms of flash burn

The symptoms include:

   Pain that may be mild to very severe, usually starting a few hours after the incident
   Bloodshot eyes
   Light sensitivity
   Watery eyes
   Blurred vision
   The feeling of having something in your eye.

Sources of flash burn

You can receive a flash burn after being exposed to UV light. Sources include:

   Welding torch
   Direct sunlight
   Reflection of the sun off water or snow
   Sunlamp in a tanning salon
   Some types of lamps, such as halogen or a photographer’s flood lamp.

Diagnosis requires an eye examination, which may include:

   Anaesthetic drops – the doctor may use eye drops to numb your eyes. These drops work long enough to examine your eyes and should not be used more than once
   Inspection – the eyes are checked for damage
   Dye – the doctor may put orange dye in your eyes. This shows up any damage when a special blue light is used. The dye is harmless and washes out with your tears.


Last edited by gadily on Sun Jan 19, 2014 4:22 am; edited 1 time in total
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PostSubject: Re: wood burner safety info   Sun Jan 19, 2014 4:12 am

welding safety info

No there is virtually no way for MIG to electrocute you. Yes you can touch work piece with bare hand while welding. You are much more likely to be injured by hot metal and spatter than electricity. Wear safety clothing ALL cotton no poly/nylon. tiny balls of molten metal constantly pop and bounce when welding will sting arms a little but not cause any real damage but if one gets inside your clothing will cause 3rd degree burns.

I had a piece of spatter land in wrinkle of shirt (i was welding overhead) burn thru roll down my chest and came to rest in waistband of my pants it proceeded to but a hole in my skin that took a while to heal because it cauterized wound. A friend has similar experience because he was wearing sneakers landed in laces melted thru tongue of shoe and into the top of his foot. Just be careful. When you work with melted metal you WILL get burned its the nature of life be sure to take steps to minimize the risk and carry on.

however with some migs there torch is live at the tip putting it down on the work piece may cause a bright flash

HOT

after welding please do not touch the piece as the offending metal will be red hot to the touch and will burn you

dk welder could you please put up the info on the arc welders as you may know more than i do with them
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PostSubject: Re: wood burner safety info   Sun Jan 19, 2014 5:28 am

A carbon monoxide detector is an absolute must, more people die from carbon monoxide trying to keep themselves warm.
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rageoftheblacksmith



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PostSubject: More on welding/blacksmithing safety   Sun Jan 19, 2014 9:10 am

As well said above, cutting, grinding, forging and welding can be dangerous for many reasons.
Anyway, professional welders and blacksmiths do those things for years learning to avoid the worst accidents.

The non professional DIY-ers should follow the advice from who has a lifetime experience in the business.

A few things that come to my mind, having been there and done that:

1- don't just use an eye protection, get a GOOD one! I can't count how many times something shot to my eyes despite wearing some kind of safety goggles; there are some eye protection goggles that look like a diver's mask but have a ventilation system so they don't get foggy while you are grinding.

2- buy good quality gloves that are "approved" for blacksmithing; don't use gardening gloves or rubber gloves when dealing with really hot stuff. Don't weld wearing sneakers! Safety shoes are cheap and if you can afford to spend a bit more there are special safety shoes for blacksmiths with an additional protection against hot stuff burning through the shoes' tongue.

3- grinding produces lots of "dust" and you should try not to breath lots of it; if you are mostly grinding indoors you should keep in mind that some of that grinding dust is kinda volatile and you'll breath some. Probably a paper mask gives you some protection against dust buildup in your lungs and breathing pipes.

4- if you happen to weld galvanized steel or steel that was zinc plated in a hot zinc bath, DON'T BREATH THE FUMES!!! It is really bad for your health and, even though you usually only get some fever and mild sickness, doing it again and again can be very bad. According to some sources it can be lethal. In this case a paper mask is not enough, you should use some kind of really filtered breathing mask.

5- for the same reasons as breathing zinc fumes, avoid to spray-paint indoors without a breathing filter: the solvents used in many paint products are said to be carcinogenic.

6- you usually do that kind of job with old clothes that can be burned or take a few holes because you don't wear them every day but if you want to be safe buy a thick leather blacksmith's apron: molten steel drops won't go through it and your clothes to your skin. This is very important especially in case of overhead welding.

7- a welding mask is a welding mask, there is not much to be said about it but keep in mind that there are many different degrees of glass "darkness" (= UV protection) and you shouldn't use the low protection dark glass for a very long time, especially when TIG and MIG welding. Nowadays self-darkening welding helmets are much cheaper than they used to be some years ago: they have two big advantages, one being that both your hands are free and another is that you can choose the darkness (= UV protection level) by turning a knob. If you are going to do lots of tack-welding and you do it holding the pieces with one hand and the torch or stick with the other hand, you don't have a 3rd hand so you'll close your eyes and tack-weld. Your eyelids will provide some protection to your eyes but if you do it a lot you'll have your face burned. It can be a real pain, so if you can't use a self-darkening helmet cover your face with the strongest sun screen cream you can find and, when you're done, wash your face and apply a hydrating cream or oil.

8- the blacksmith's best friend is the hammer. You should always take good care of your hammer(s) handle; if it's wooden it might need to be replaced every now and then, if it's shrinking you should keep it in a water bucket overnight so that the hammer head cannot fly away (eventually killing somebody in its path) when you hit your piece of steel. If your hammer(s) have a resin handle just check that the head doesn't move.

9- most of the tools we use nowadays are electric tools and some of them draw a very big power; never forget the basics of electric safety when dealing with those tools: don't use lots of extension cords attached to one another, periodically check the contacts in all your equipement, keep that stuff away from water. You probably have a differential switch in your electric plant, because i think it's mandatory by law; if you don't have one have it installed by an electrician: it is said that it saves lives. Whenever you decide to replace one of your tools' power cord do it with an extra flexible silicon whatever it's called cord: it will last longer and the insulation won't easily break because you keep rolling and unrolling it.

10- try to keep in mind the laws of physics: a power drill can twist your arm (or worse) if the drill bit gets stuck while you are drilling in a wrong way; an angle grinder can "bounce", especially if you're using a damaged disc, and cut through you like a hot knife does to the butter. A drill press can be as dangerous as it's useful: never have your gloves get within the chuck or drill bit reach or you'll be sorry! If you use an anvil be sure that the anvil cannot fall from it's table or big chunk of wood or whatever surface you keep it on: an anvil is usually very heavy and you don't want to be in its falling path.

11- if you think or realize that your equipement is not big or sturdy or powerful enough for the job you're trying to do, unless you really know the tricks of the trade, try to find some help. Maybe there's a blacksmith who's better equipped and can solve one small problem for a few bucks or for free. Avoiding unnecessary risks may slow down your project but will make you go to have your dinner with all your fingers, toes, eyes and other useful body parts in good shape.

I know that the professionals and/or experienced will be bored reading this post but i had my dose of burns, cuts, bruises, E.R. and stitches, eye doctor... If this reminder can save one stovie some of that stuff it is a good thing.

Keep Hammering On!
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PostSubject: Re: wood burner safety info   Mon Jan 20, 2014 1:21 pm

Gadily I am completely with you on the safety issues, one cannot over emphasize the various facets of safety and as far as I am concerned it is no light matter or a place for jokes and a bit of side slapping.

I encourage anyone who feels a safety issue involved with the fabrication of wood stoves or bio char stoves to chime in, and to tell you the truth I do not care if any of the information is repeated.
I will let it be known here that none of the forum moderators or admins will tolerate any belittling in any posts, especially on a matter like this posted by a member.
I do not care if it is even in jest.

Safety as far as I am concerned when it comes to stove building is paramount, you can lose limbs, eyes to flash burn, and your life to a poorly built and poorly tested and installed stove.
So anyone who wants to joke about safety issues, or challenges anyone on such a post like this their post will be removed.

Not to mention very serious safety issues when trying to use stoves to heat water.
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jameshookway

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PostSubject: Re: wood burner safety info   Tue Jan 21, 2014 5:07 am

I would like to also mention recycling of old gas bottles to turn into stoves.

They are dangerous and can explode.  :affraid: 

I have been looking on the web to find out how to cut them up safely and the only way I have seen is to remove the regulator, fill them with water and leave over night. I am not sure if this is the best way.

Has anyone got any suggestions?

James
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PostSubject: Re: wood burner safety info   Tue Jan 21, 2014 6:49 am

Hi James,

That scared the Hell out of me too. Took me ages to get round to actually making first cut!
Spent a month pressing in the release valve every time I passed the bottle.
Removed the valve, damn tight but got it in the end with the help of a crowbar, through the base and a length of scaffold pipe, on the adjustable spanner.
Next flushed the bottle, garden hose all the way to the bottom and an old screwdriver to make a gap for the air/any gas to escape. I left it 2 hours flushing. Being very afraid for myself repeated this 3 times over a week, leaving the bottle upside-down to drain in between times.
Then spent another week contemplating another source of a cylinder before I actually picked up the grinder.
As you can guess by the fact I'm writing this all went without any drama but I'll probably be no faster the next time I do one.

Jack
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PostSubject: Re: wood burner safety info   Tue Jan 21, 2014 7:49 am

jameshookway wrote:
I would like to also mention recycling of old gas bottles to turn into stoves.

They are dangerous and can explode.  :affraid: 

I have been looking on the web to find out how to cut them up safely and the only way I have seen is to remove the regulator, fill them with water and leave over night. I am not sure if this is the best way.

Has anyone got any suggestions?

James

Hello James, Maybe I can be of a little assistance and try to explain a little on how to work safely with the Hazards of old gas bottles or any used flammable container.

Flammable liquids can become impregnated in the pores of the steel, inside the metal container. These flammable Vapor's are released when the steel container becomes heated, whether its with extreme hot water, torch or cut-off grinding wheel.

The only safe way I know of to work with these types of flammable and or explosive used containers is this. The Oxygen in the container has to be controlled, either by a hot chemical washing process or the introduction of a none flammable inert gas.

I personally like to purge the flammable container with carbon monoxide that I am working with. I will hook a hose to the exhaust of a gas engine and purge the container until Its so hot, I cant hold my bare hand on it, Then I will start the repair process. I leave the hose on until I have finished the repair or I have cut the container in two and exposed it to the atmospheric air. Now your safe.

I never encourage anyone to try this for the first time by themselves, Unless being properly supervised. I always try to encourage the use of another suitable none hazardous container if available. The risk isn't worth it.
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PostSubject: Re: wood burner safety info   Tue Jan 21, 2014 8:24 am

Thanks for that guys. I will be cautious and take precautions, but I will have to go ahead as there is no alternative.

James
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PostSubject: Re: wood burner safety info   Tue Jan 21, 2014 11:24 am

jameshookway wrote:
I would like to also mention recycling of old gas bottles to turn into stoves.

They are dangerous and can explode.  :affraid: 

I have been looking on the web to find out how to cut them up safely and the only way I have seen is to remove the regulator, fill them with water and leave over night. I am not sure if this is the best way.

Has anyone got any suggestions?

James

That is the most common method of flushing a bottle James and I have never had any problems after doing so. I worked at a Coach building firm when I was 15, the welders and tinsmiths used exactly the same method to repair and modify petrol and diesel fuel tanks, empty them and fill with water drain and weld.
The bottles still have that gas smell after being washed out but this is an organic ingredient called ethyl mercaptan, it's added to propane to actually make the Gas smell of something Propane has no smell of its own. Propane gas is heavy so settles in the bottom, By filling the bottle with water it purges out the gas. I fill and drain leaving the bottle upside down overnight so any gas settles out of the valve hole.

If anyone has not tried cutting a bottle with a jigsaw and metal cutting blade they should. it cuts quicker than a disc With no sparks flying around.
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jameshookway

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PostSubject: Re: wood burner safety info   Tue Jan 21, 2014 7:45 pm

Thanks for the info Very Happy I am still nervous but I will have to cut my first one soon
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PostSubject: Re: wood burner safety info   Wed Jan 22, 2014 8:47 am

James,

Send me a pm and I will provide you with my mobile number and we can have a chat about what I do, and how I have managed to get the regulator off of these old gas bottles - it may be easier than just reading about it 24 x 7 for weeks on end....which is what I did, and is seemingly where you are! Fear not, the ways that you have found are exactly what I did but being walked through verbally might help.

In short, I would leave the bottle to vent for considerably longer than a couple of hours.........e.g If I was wanting to cut into a bottle this weekend coming, I can absolutely assure you that the regulator would have been removed last weekend and I would have filled and emptied the bottle at least once a day!

ppottys response is absolutely bang on the money about leaving things upside down, then filling with water etc!

Regards the cutting into the bottles, I can only speak from my experience which has been angle grinder.....that said I use a .8mm disc which gives a very nice cut!

Anyway, offer stands if you want to chat.

Bezman
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PostSubject: Re: wood burner safety info   Wed Jan 22, 2014 11:49 am

rageoftheblacksmith wrote:
As well said above, cutting, grinding, forging and welding can be dangerous for many reasons.
Anyway, professional welders and blacksmiths do those things for years learning to avoid the worst accidents.

The non professional DIY-ers should follow the advice from who has a lifetime experience in the business.

A few things that come to my mind, having been there and done that:

1- don't just use an eye protection, get a GOOD one! I can't count how many times something shot to my eyes despite wearing some kind of safety goggles; there are some eye protection goggles that look like a diver's mask but have a ventilation system so they don't get foggy while you are grinding.

2- buy good quality gloves that are "approved" for blacksmithing; don't use gardening gloves or rubber gloves when dealing with really hot stuff. Don't weld wearing sneakers! Safety shoes are cheap and if you can afford to spend a bit more there are special safety shoes for blacksmiths with an additional protection against hot stuff burning through the shoes' tongue.

3- grinding produces lots of "dust" and you should try not to breath lots of it; if you are mostly grinding indoors you should keep in mind that some of that grinding dust is kinda volatile and you'll breath some. Probably a paper mask gives you some protection against dust buildup in your lungs and breathing pipes.

4- if you happen to weld galvanized steel or steel that was zinc plated in a hot zinc bath, DON'T BREATH THE FUMES!!! It is really bad for your health and, even though you usually only get some fever and mild sickness, doing it again and again can be very bad. According to some sources it can be lethal. In this case a paper mask is not enough, you should use some kind of really filtered breathing mask.

5- for the same reasons as breathing zinc fumes, avoid to spray-paint indoors without a breathing filter: the solvents used in many paint products are said to be carcinogenic.

6- you usually do that kind of job with old clothes that can be burned or take a few holes because you don't wear them every day but if you want to be safe buy a thick leather blacksmith's apron: molten steel drops won't go through it and your clothes to your skin. This is very important especially in case of overhead welding.

7- a welding mask is a welding mask, there is not much to be said about it but keep in mind that there are many different degrees of glass "darkness" (= UV protection) and you shouldn't use the low protection dark glass for a very long time, especially when TIG and MIG welding. Nowadays self-darkening welding helmets are much cheaper than they used to be some years ago: they have two big advantages, one being that both your hands are free and another is that you can choose the darkness (= UV protection level) by turning a knob. If you are going to do lots of tack-welding and you do it holding the pieces with one hand and the torch or stick with the other hand, you don't have a 3rd hand so you'll close your eyes and tack-weld. Your eyelids will provide some protection to your eyes but if you do it a lot you'll have your face burned. It can be a real pain, so if you can't use a self-darkening helmet cover your face with the strongest sun screen cream you can find and, when you're done, wash your face and apply a hydrating cream or oil.

8- the blacksmith's best friend is the hammer. You should always take good care of your hammer(s) handle; if it's wooden it might need to be replaced every now and then, if it's shrinking you should keep it in a water bucket overnight so that the hammer head cannot fly away (eventually killing somebody in its path) when you hit your piece of steel. If your hammer(s) have a resin handle just check that the head doesn't move.

9- most of the tools we use nowadays are electric tools and some of them draw a very big power; never forget the basics of electric safety when dealing with those tools: don't use lots of extension cords attached to one another, periodically check the contacts in all your equipement, keep that stuff away from water. You probably have a differential switch in your electric plant, because i think it's mandatory by law; if you don't have one have it installed by an electrician: it is said that it saves lives. Whenever you decide to replace one of your tools' power cord do it with an extra flexible silicon whatever it's called cord: it will last longer and the insulation won't easily break because you keep rolling and unrolling it.

10- try to keep in mind the laws of physics: a power drill can twist your arm (or worse) if the drill bit gets stuck while you are drilling in a wrong way; an angle grinder can "bounce", especially if you're using a damaged disc, and cut through you like a hot knife does to the butter. A drill press can be as dangerous as it's useful: never have your gloves get within the chuck or drill bit reach or you'll be sorry! If you use an anvil be sure that the anvil cannot fall from it's table or big chunk of wood or whatever surface you keep it on: an anvil is usually very heavy and you don't want to be in its falling path.

11- if you think or realize that your equipement is not big or sturdy or powerful enough for the job you're trying to do, unless you really know the tricks of the trade, try to find some help. Maybe there's a blacksmith who's better equipped and can solve one small problem for a few bucks or for free. Avoiding unnecessary risks may slow down your project but will make you go to have your dinner with all your fingers, toes, eyes and other useful body parts in good shape.

I know that the professionals and/or experienced will be bored reading this post but i had my dose of burns, cuts, bruises, E.R. and stitches, eye doctor... If this reminder can save one stovie some of that stuff it is a good thing.

Keep Hammering On!
This is all great stuff, just a few days ago while grinding I felt something get really hot very fast on my right leg, I looked down to see my jeans on fire!
Had to smack out the flames, all I received was a light burn, but it could have been pretty bad had I not felt the pain so quickly.

The dog gone sparks caught the cotton fibers on fire, so next up, the leather apron.
thanks for posting these great tips and again thanks to gadily for creating the thread.
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Josjor



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PostSubject: Re: wood burner safety info   Wed Jan 22, 2014 10:46 pm

All good stuff, but there is one (to me) glaring absence:

Hearing protection. Grinding, hammering, etc. are NOISY operations. You have one set of ears. Period. The little foam earplugs are extremely cheap compared to hearing aids and implants. If you, like me, switch back and forth between the noisy operations (grinding and hammering) to the quieter ones (welding and drilling) you may want to use earmuffs. A good quality set will be under $20.00. Again, cheap when compared to hearing aids and implants.

Maybe I'm a little more aware of this than others as I own a music store, work as a sound engineer, and play in a band. I earn my main living largely with my ears.

rageoftheblacksmith wrote:
As well said above, cutting, grinding, forging and welding can be dangerous for many reasons.
Anyway, professional welders and blacksmiths do those things for years learning to avoid the worst accidents.

The non professional DIY-ers should follow the advice from who has a lifetime experience in the business.

A few things that come to my mind, having been there and done that:

1- don't just use an eye protection, get a GOOD one! I can't count how many times something shot to my eyes despite wearing some kind of safety goggles; there are some eye protection goggles that look like a diver's mask but have a ventilation system so they don't get foggy while you are grinding.

2- buy good quality gloves that are "approved" for blacksmithing; don't use gardening gloves or rubber gloves when dealing with really hot stuff. Don't weld wearing sneakers! Safety shoes are cheap and if you can afford to spend a bit more there are special safety shoes for blacksmiths with an additional protection against hot stuff burning through the shoes' tongue.

3- grinding produces lots of "dust" and you should try not to breath lots of it; if you are mostly grinding indoors you should keep in mind that some of that grinding dust is kinda volatile and you'll breath some. Probably a paper mask gives you some protection against dust buildup in your lungs and breathing pipes.

4- if you happen to weld galvanized steel or steel that was zinc plated in a hot zinc bath, DON'T BREATH THE FUMES!!! It is really bad for your health and, even though you usually only get some fever and mild sickness, doing it again and again can be very bad. According to some sources it can be lethal. In this case a paper mask is not enough, you should use some kind of really filtered breathing mask.

5- for the same reasons as breathing zinc fumes, avoid to spray-paint indoors without a breathing filter: the solvents used in many paint products are said to be carcinogenic.

6- you usually do that kind of job with old clothes that can be burned or take a few holes because you don't wear them every day but if you want to be safe buy a thick leather blacksmith's apron: molten steel drops won't go through it and your clothes to your skin. This is very important especially in case of overhead welding.

7- a welding mask is a welding mask, there is not much to be said about it but keep in mind that there are many different degrees of glass "darkness" (= UV protection) and you shouldn't use the low protection dark glass for a very long time, especially when TIG and MIG welding. Nowadays self-darkening welding helmets are much cheaper than they used to be some years ago: they have two big advantages, one being that both your hands are free and another is that you can choose the darkness (= UV protection level) by turning a knob. If you are going to do lots of tack-welding and you do it holding the pieces with one hand and the torch or stick with the other hand, you don't have a 3rd hand so you'll close your eyes and tack-weld. Your eyelids will provide some protection to your eyes but if you do it a lot you'll have your face burned. It can be a real pain, so if you can't use a self-darkening helmet cover your face with the strongest sun screen cream you can find and, when you're done, wash your face and apply a hydrating cream or oil.

8- the blacksmith's best friend is the hammer. You should always take good care of your hammer(s) handle; if it's wooden it might need to be replaced every now and then, if it's shrinking you should keep it in a water bucket overnight so that the hammer head cannot fly away (eventually killing somebody in its path) when you hit your piece of steel. If your hammer(s) have a resin handle just check that the head doesn't move.

9- most of the tools we use nowadays are electric tools and some of them draw a very big power; never forget the basics of electric safety when dealing with those tools: don't use lots of extension cords attached to one another, periodically check the contacts in all your equipement, keep that stuff away from water. You probably have a differential switch in your electric plant, because i think it's mandatory by law; if you don't have one have it installed by an electrician: it is said that it saves lives. Whenever you decide to replace one of your tools' power cord do it with an extra flexible silicon whatever it's called cord: it will last longer and the insulation won't easily break because you keep rolling and unrolling it.

10- try to keep in mind the laws of physics: a power drill can twist your arm (or worse) if the drill bit gets stuck while you are drilling in a wrong way; an angle grinder can "bounce", especially if you're using a damaged disc, and cut through you like a hot knife does to the butter. A drill press can be as dangerous as it's useful: never have your gloves get within the chuck or drill bit reach or you'll be sorry! If you use an anvil be sure that the anvil cannot fall from it's table or big chunk of wood or whatever surface you keep it on: an anvil is usually very heavy and you don't want to be in its falling path.

11- if you think or realize that your equipement is not big or sturdy or powerful enough for the job you're trying to do, unless you really know the tricks of the trade, try to find some help. Maybe there's a blacksmith who's better equipped and can solve one small problem for a few bucks or for free. Avoiding unnecessary risks may slow down your project but will make you go to have your dinner with all your fingers, toes, eyes and other useful body parts in good shape.

I know that the professionals and/or experienced will be bored reading this post but i had my dose of burns, cuts, bruises, E.R. and stitches, eye doctor... If this reminder can save one stovie some of that stuff it is a good thing.

Keep Hammering On!
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PostSubject: Re: wood burner safety info   Thu Jan 30, 2014 9:20 am

Here is some food for thought, improper installation, poorly built stoves, heat shielding requirements not being put to use properly can and will produce these results.

When it comes to safety this is not something to take lightly.

http://bangordailynews.com/2013/01/17/news/mid-maine/newport-home-damaged-by-fire-pellet-stove-blamed/
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PostSubject: Re: wood burner safety info   

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wood burner safety info
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